Mental Health Awareness for Managers – Worcester February 2007

The next venue for our popular Mental Health Awareness for Managers course is Worcester in February.

Date 14th February 2017
Location Worcester County Cricket Club
Course fee £220 per person

Delegates enjoying mental health training eventThis course is designed to help managers promote the mental well-being of their staff and support employees who may be experiencing mental health problems.

Mental health problems, such as stress, anxiety and depression, are one of the top three causes of sickness absence in the work place today.  Managers and supervisors have an important part to play in addressing this issue – their behaviour has a significant impact on the mental wellbeing of their staff and they are likely to be the first people to be involved when problems arise,

Through a lively mix of discussion, personal accounts, videos and case studies, this course equips line managers with the knowledge they need to promote good mental health in the work place and support staff with mental health problems.

 

The  course covers:

  • The costs of poor mental health at  work.
  • Overcoming the stigma of mental health.
  • The common mental health conditions – what it is like to experience them, their symptoms and treatment.
  • Mental health at work and the law.
  • What makes for good mental health at work.
  • Managing for good mental health.
  • How to support staff with mental health problems.
  • Absence management and

Who should attend:  Managers and supervisors with responsibility for staff, HR professionals.

To book you place online click here or call us on 01386 839427.

We can also run this as in in-house course course, please call for more information.

How stressed was Business Expo?

expo-2016We had a great day manning our stand in the Wellbeing Zone at Hereford and Worcester Chamber of Commerce’s Business Expo on 6th October.   As part of our work promoting good mental health at work, we invited visitors to our stand to complete a short questionnaire designed to gauge the levels of stress they were experiencing in their daily lives.  The results are shown below:

expo

The good news is that over half (55%) of those who completed the questionnaire came out with low or moderately-low levels of stress.  It was no surprise that around half of those with the lowest stress levels were retired.  What did surprise us were a couple of individuals with quite stressful jobs, e.g events management and social work, who had very low levels of stress.  It goes to show some of us are just more chilled and stress-resilient than others.  

At the other end of the scale, 18% of the visitors came out with high or very-high stress levels.   When we talked to these people about their stress we found that around half of them were experiencing some form of personal trauma , e.g. a recent bereavement.   In the others their stress was more long-term and work-related. 

Most of us can cope with elevated levels of stress for reasonable periods of time, e.g. a month or two, without any adverse effects.  However, stress becomes unsafe when it is long-term or when it starts to impact on our daily lives.  Long-term stress can result in a range of emotional, physical and behavioural symptoms, including:  moodiness and irritability, aches and pains and frequent minor ailments, and insomnia and increased use of alcohol.  It is important that employers take steps to ensure their employees and are not subject to unreasonable levels of stress, not least because they have a legal duty of care.  It is also in the employer’s interest to address the issue: stress is a major cause of sickness absence and when an employee is signed off with stress it is likely to be for an extended period -the average is 23 days.  Long-term stress can also lead to other conditions such as anxiety and depression, and eventually burn-out. So, prevention is most definitely better than cure.

Enable Works Ltd provides training to help employers and employees manage stress.

Mental Health Awareness for Managers course

In November we are running a one-day Mental Health Awareness for Managers course.

Date: 29 November 2016
Venue: National Star College, Ullenwood, Cheltenham, GL53 9QU
Cost £190

Mental Health for Managers trianing course image.Mental health problems, such as stress, anxiety and depression, are on of the most significant causes of sickness absence.  Managers and supervisors have an important part to play in addressing this issue – their behaviour has a significant impact on the mental wellbeing of their staff and they are likely to be the first people to be involved when problems arise.

This course equips managers and supervisors with the knowledge, skills and awareness they need need to better manage mental health in the work place and support staff who are experiencing mental health problems.

The  course covers:

  • The costs of poor mental health at  work.
  • Overcoming the stigma of mental health.
  • The common mental health conditions – what it is like to experience them, their symptoms and treatment.
  • Mental health at work and the law.
  • What makes for good mental health at work.
  • How to talk to staff about their mental health.
  • Real-life case studies.

Who should attend:  Managers and supervisors with responsibility for staff, HR professionals.

To book you place online click here or call us on 01386 839427.

We can also run this as in in-house course course, please call for more information.

 

Five of the best mental health videos

Videos can be a great way of communicating the the issue of Mental Health at Work, but it can be tough finding good ones.  Too many of them follow a similar format of talking heads (sufferers or experts) with a downbeat sound track  – not the sort of thing to grab someone’s attention.  However, there are some good ones out there – we’ve scoured to internet to find the best of the bunch.

No.1  The Power of OK

Produced by SeeMe Scotland, this is by far the best mental health video we have come across.   It’s fun, fast-paced and powerful, and a refreshing change from the “talking heads” format.  We really like the rhythm of the language and the images.   We’d be equally happy showing it to a Board of Directors or a bunch of brickies on a building site.  It does contain the f -word and other explicit language. but we think it is appropriate and justified.

No. 2 The Big Cheesy

The follow on from the Power of OK, focusing on the manager’s role.  Equally well done.

No. 3 Mental Health at Work: Recognising distress

While not in the same class as The Power of OK, this video from the Mental Health Foundation for Royal Mail is well-produced and does a good job of encouraging people to talk about their mental health problems..  As well as being an expert, the narrator, Isabelle Goldie has a splendid Scottish accent which makes you sit up and take notice – think Jean Brodie.

No. 4   Ruby Wax: What’s so funny about Mental Illness? TED Talk

Ruby wax gives an insight in into living with depression in her inimitable style. 

No. 5  Living with a mental disorder

OK, this is one of those talkingheads with a down beat sound track videos, but to our mind it does the best job of putting into words (and graphics) what it is like to experience stress, anxiety, depression and OCD.